red apple

red apple

Apples can help reduce the risk of many diseases, including cancer, asthma and heart disease. Apples are a great source of fiber, too. In fact, one large apple supplies 5 grams of fiber, which is about 20% of the recommended daily intake.


Preparation Tips

Rub cut apples with lemon juice to keep slices and wedges creamy white for hours.

Store apples in a plastic bag in the refrigerator away from strong-odored foods such as cabbage or onions to prevent flavor transfer.


Trivia

Apples are the second most important of all fruits sold in the supermarket, ranking next to bananas.

Tens of thousands of varieties of apples are grown worldwide.

The history of apple consumption dates from Stone Age cultivation in areas we now know as Austria and Switzerland.

In ancient Greece, tossing an apple to a girl was a traditional proposal of marriage; catching it was acceptance.

Folk hero Johnny Appleseed (John Chapman) did indeed spread the cultivation of apples in the United States. He knew enough about apples, however, so that he did not distribute seeds, because apples do not grow true from seeds. Instead, he established nurseries in Pennsylvania and Ohio.

Three medium-sized apples weigh approximately one pound.

One pound of apples, cored and sliced, measures about 4 1/2 cups.

Purchase about 2 pounds of whole apples for a 9-inch pie.

One large apple, cored and processed through a food grinder or processor, makes about 1 cup of ground apple.